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Division of International Services
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Visiting Scientists
B-1/WB

B-1/WB Temporary Visitors for Business Purpose

To engage in short-term business activities, such as consulting with colleagues, attending professional meetings/conferences, or conducting independent research

NIH Designations

NIH Designations that can be supported as B-1/WB: Non-FTE (Full-Time Equivalent) positions EXCEPT for Visiting Fellow designations

Duration

B-1/WB Business visitors are generally allowed three (3) to six (6) month periods of stay in the U.S. However, visitors who entered under the Visa Waiver Program (“WB” status) are granted a maximum of ninety (90) days of stay. The B-1/WB status begins when the foreign national scientist acquires B-1/WB status within the U.S. B-1 extensions may be possible on a case-by-case basis as reviewed by the DIS. No extensions are possible for WB visitors.

Funding for Individuals in B-1 or WB Status

B-1 or WB Visitors must demonstrate to U.S. Consular and/or DHS officials that adequate financial arrangements exist to enable them to fulfill the purpose of their visit to the U.S., to avoid unlawful employment, and to ensure their departure from the U.S.

B-1 or WB Visitors may not receive a salary or other remuneration from a U.S. source other than reimbursement for expenses incidental to the individual's temporary stay (i.e., per diem and travel) and honorarium in limited circumstances. If DOS or DHS believes that the amount being paid to the scientist is comparable to a salary, the Business Visitor will be denied a B-1 visa and/or entry into the U.S. in B-1 or WB status.

Information on Obtaining B-1 or WB Status

When applying for the B-1 visa from a U.S. Consulate and/or obtaining entry to the U.S. by DHS officials, the scientist should present an original letter from the NIH host/sponsor, on NIH letterhead, stating the purpose of the visit (refer to “Who Can Come to NIH in B-1 or WB Status?”). This letter should:

  • Avoid using the term "volunteer" as this can result in the scientist being given a tourist (B-2) visa by the U.S. Consulate and/or being admitted by the DHS into the U.S. in B-2 or WT (B-2 Visa Waiver Program) status.
  • Make clear the purpose of the visit (e.g. to consult with associates in the field) and NOT to work for NIH.
  • Mention (1) the length of the proposed visit (for B-1s, usually no longer than six months; for WBs, no more than 90 days); (2) that no stipend or salary will be provided and, (3), if applicable, that only travel and/or per diem expenses and/or honorarium will be reimbursed.
  • Include this letter (with signature by the NIH host) with the request for assignment sent to the Division of International Services (DIS) by the NIH Institute or Center (IC). Refer to the DIS checklists for full documentation requirements. The DIS will send the scientist the NIH host letter, along with the official B-1 or WB invitation letter.
  • If applicable, the scientist should also carry a letter from his or her employer stating that the employer is aware that the scientist is coming to consult with associates at NIH, and that his or her salary will continue to be paid by the employer or other home country sources.

Entry into the U.S. in B-1 Status

When being admitted into the U.S., the foreign scientist should request that the DHS Immigration Inspector indicate “B-1” on the Form I-94 (Arrival-Departure Record) and include the period of admission specified in the NIH letters of invitation. To assist the DHS Inspector, the scientist should present the letters from the NIH host, the DIS, and the home country employer (if applicable). The visa stamp in the passport usually indicates B-1/B-2, and DHS officials may erroneously annotate “B-2” rather than “B-1” on the Form I-94. Such an error will prevent the scientist from participating in the business activities until his or her status is changed to B-1 by the DHS, a procedure that could take 2-3 months.

B-1 Visitors must depart the U.S. or file an application for an extension of stay on or before the expiration date on their Forms I-94. There is no grace period for individuals in B-1 status. Therefore, failure by the Business Visitor to depart or timely submit an application for an extension of stay will result in an unlawful overstay.

*NOTE: Canadian citizens do not need to apply for a B-1 visa to enter the U.S. When coming to the NIH, however, they must undergo U.S. customs and immigration inspection and obtain evidence that they were admitted in B-1 status. Therefore, when entering the U.S., Canadians must obtain either a Form I-94 OR an entry date-stamp in the passport marked “B-1” to indicate that they were admitted in B-1 status.

REMINDER: B-2 status is NEVER appropriate for ANY foreign scientist carrying out research activities in NIH's laboratories for any period of time under any circumstances. An individual coming to NIH for an interview, who was admitted to the U.S. in B-2 status, CANNOT be reimbursed for travel or per diem expenses.

Entry into the U.S. in WB Status: B-1/B-2 VISA WAIVER PROGRAM (VWP)

As a result of the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986, provisions were made for nationals of eight countries to come to the United States without obtaining a B-1 (Business) or B-2 (Tourist) visa. Since then, other countries have been added to the VWP. Eligible nationals who wish to come under this program do not need to obtain a B-1/B-2 visa from a U.S. Consulate to enter the U.S. An individual who is a national of a participating country (regardless of place of residence or point of embarkation) may seek admission under this program provided that the individual:

  1. Seeks admission to the U.S. for a period not to exceed 90 days;
  2. Possesses a passport that meets VWP requirements. NOTE: if the individual does not have a passport that meets VWP requirements, then he/she is not eligible for the VWP and must instead obtain a B-1 visa stamp for entry into the U.S.;
  3. Has obtained approval via the Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) at least seventy-two (72) hours prior to travel to the U.S.. NOTE: if the individual does not receive ESTA approval, then he/she is not eligible for the VWP and must instead obtain a B-1 visa stamp for entry into the U.S.;
  4. Has an onward or return trip ticket which will transport the individual out of the U.S. and the contiguous areas of Canada and Mexico, and adjacent islands in the Caribbean - unless the individual is a resident of the contiguous areas or adjacent islands; and
  5. Arrives aboard a carrier that has signed an agreement with the U.S. Government to participate in the VWP.

The individual must still also meet all eligibility requirements, funding, and documents to obtain Business Visitor status, as discussed in this advisory.

When being admitted into the U.S., the foreign scientist should request that the DHS Immigration Inspector provide an entry date-stamp in the passport to indicate “WB” (Visa Waiver for Business) as his/her immigration status and include the period of admission specified in the NIH sponsor's letter of invitation (not to exceed 90 days). To assist the DHS Inspector, the scientist should present the letters from the NIH host, the DIS and the home country employer (if applicable). Please note that those admitted in WB status are not issued a Form I-94; the entry date-stamp from the passport is acceptable evidence of admission in WB status.

Although DIS instructs the foreign scientist about entering the U.S. in WB status, the IC sponsor and administrative Key Contact should also reinforce this, inasmuch as DHS officials may erroneously annotate “WT” rather than “WB.” Such an error may prevent the scientist from participating in the business activities until his or her status is changed to WB by the DHS, a procedure that could take 2-3 months.

WB Visitors must depart the U.S. on or before the expiration date listed on their entry date-stamps in the passport. There is no grace period for individuals in WB status. Therefore, failure by the Business Visitor to depart will result in an unlawful overstay.

There are several very important restrictions that apply to those who come under the VWP. Most important are that once in the United States an individual cannot apply for a change of immigration status or for an extension of stay in the U.S. beyond the 90-day limit under the VWP.

Therefore, if there is any intention that the individual will remain at NIH beyond 90 days, he/she should apply for a B-1 visa at the U.S. Consulate in the home country and enter the U.S. in B-1 status. REMINDER: WT status is NEVER appropriate for ANY foreign scientist carrying out research activities in NIH's laboratories for any period of time under any circumstances. An individual coming to NIH for an interview, who was admitted to the U.S. in WT status, CANNOT be reimbursed for travel or per diem expenses.

LINKS

For additional information on the B-1, Visitor for Business, click here. Click here for full details on the Visa Waiver Program, including passport and ESTA requirements.

DIS Info 
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Check-In Hours:
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